Timber Plank Table

A new and extremely simple plank table is about to enter the stage. The table is designed by the Danish architect firm, Friis & Moltke, and Getama is putting it into production. The new Timber dining table consists of two oak planks and a custom-made metal hinge. It is available in eleven different sizes. Getama’s carpentry workshop can even tailor special sizes on demand.

Inspiration

The idea for the table arose when Friis & Moltke needed a solid table that was able to withstand daily wear and tear while, at the same time, creating the right framework for their cafeteria. Besides serving as a practical dining table, its design would have to blend in easily with the surroundings of a private dining room, an elegant conference room, a busy restaurant, or a frequented museum. Mikkel Bahr, industrial designer and head of Friis & Moltke’s design department, successfully managed to create just the right thing.

It was essential for Mikkel Bahr to make the plank table as solid as possible so that it could be used for any imaginable purpose. To meet this requirement, Friis & Moltke joined forces with a smith from Aarhus in Denmark and developed a metal profile that secures and buckles the oblique table legs, locking them into place for extra stability. For additional functionality, Getama decided to put an extension leaf into production.

Not only is the table an esthetical experience because of its simplicity, it is also highly functional because it is designed without an inconvenient table rail. As a way of giving the genuine plank table a lighter expression, Friis & Moltke chose to space the two planks.

A new bid for brutalism

Although the table is an entirely new design, it does contain a large amount of Friis & Moltke DNA, typically featured by their unsentimental approach to carpentry, production, and architecture. In the 1960’s and 1970’s, Friis & Moltke pioneered brutalism. The table is marked distinctively by this with its raw and industrial simplicity, completely devoid of fine details. Friis & Moltke is primarily renowned for the company’s architecture, but besides creating public buildings and private homes, the company also designs furniture and various accessories – and now a plank table for Getama.